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What are the seven pillars of clinical governance NHS?

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Clinical governance is a system through which NHS organisations improve the quality of the care they provide. The seven pillars of clinical governance are:

1.clear accountability and responsibility for clinical quality at all levels;

2. developing and agreeing quality improvement priorities;

3. effective engagement with patients, carers and the public in quality improvement;

4. making best use of evidence and knowledge to improve quality;

5. investing in the development of the workforce to improve quality;

6. measuring and monitoring quality; and

7. pressuring under-performing organisations to improve.

Organisations that adopt clinical governance improve their performance and accountability, and provide better care for patients.

1. Clear accountability and responsibility for clinical quality at all levels

Organisations need to have a clear line of accountability for clinical quality, so that everyone from senior managers to frontline staff understands their roles and responsibilities. This helps to ensure that quality improvement is given the attention it deserves, and that responsibility for quality rests with those who have the power to make changes.

2. Developing and agreeing quality improvement priorities

Working with patients, carers and the public, NHS organisations should identify and agree priorities for quality improvement. This ensures that quality improvement efforts are focused on the areas that matter most to patients and the public.

3. Effective engagement with patients, carers and the public in quality improvement

NHS organisations should involve patients, carers and the public in quality improvement efforts. This allows patients and the public to have a say in how care is delivered, and helps to ensure that quality improvements are made with their needs in mind.

4. Making best use of evidence and knowledge to improve quality

NHS organisations should use evidence and knowledge to drive quality improvement. This includes using data on quality indicators to identify areas for improvement, and using research evidence to guide decision-making on quality improvement.

5. Investing in the development of the workforce to improve quality

NHS organisations should invest in the development of the workforce to improve quality. This includes ensuring that staff have the skills and knowledge they need to deliver high-quality care, and providing opportunities for staff to develop their skills and knowledge.

6. Measuring and monitoring quality

NHS organisations should measure and monitor quality regularly. This helps to identify areas where quality needs to be improved, and to track progress on quality improvement.

7. Pressuring under-performing organisations to improve

NHS organisations should put pressure on under-performing organisations to improve. This includes using quality data to compare organisations, and using financial incentives and sanctions to drive quality improvements.